Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

 

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

AMs 1168-11 1865-01-30

 

Transcript:

Received at [illeg.] Jay 30 1865

By telegraph from Pollard 30 To Col. Geo W. Brent

About fourteen hundred troops at this point & no trains to move them. Can you not order cars here at once I fear they will scatter if left here long.

E. J. Harris

Col.

 

Citation: E. J. Harris, telegram to George W. Brent. 30 January 1865. AMs 1168/11

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AMs 360-15 p1  Sherman to Grant 300dpi AMs 360-15 p2  Sherman to Grant 300dpi AMs 360-15 p3  Sherman to Grant 300dpi AMs 360-15 p4  Sherman to Grant 300dpi AMs 360-15 p5  Sherman to Grant 300dpi AMs 360-15 p6  Sherman to Grant 300dpi AMs 360-15 p7  Sherman to Grant 300dpi AMs 360-15 p8  Sherman to Grant 300dpi

Transcript [excerpt p2]

Therefore I am moving as hitherto designed for the Railroad west of Branchville, then swing across to Orangeburg, which will interpose my Army between Charleston and the Interior. Contemporaneous with this Foster will demonstrate up the [illeg.] and afterwards make a lookout at Bulls Bay and occupy the Common Road which leads from Mount Pleasant towards Georgetown. When I get to Columbia I think I shall move straight for Goldsboro via Fayetteville. By this circuit I cut all Roads and devastate the land; and the forces along the Coast commanded by Foster will follow by movement taking anything the Enemy lets go or so occupies his attention that he cannot attack all his forces against me. I feel sure of getting Wilmington & maybe Charleston: and being at Goldsboro with its railroad finished back to Morehead City & Wilmington. I can easily take Raleigh, when it seems that Lee must come out of his trenches or allow his Army to be assaulted instead.

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

AMs 1168-11 1865-01-28

Transcript:

Received at Jan 28 1865

By telegraph from Columbus 28 To Col G.W. Brent

Please order Commandant of Post at Montgomery to notify me by Telegraph daily how many troops leave for this point. No trains move at night on the Muscogie Railroad troops lay over till morning otherwise no delay.

L Von Zinker

Col. Cmdg

 

Citation: L Von Zinker, telegram to George W. Brent. Columbus, Ga.; 28 January 1865. AMs 1168/11

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Backmark: “W.L. GERMON’S/Photographic Studio/914 Arch St./PHILADELPHIA/ Duplicates of this can be ordered at any time by sending Name and No_____”

 

Citation: W. L. Germon, carte de visite of unidentified sitter. Philadelphia, n.d. 2006.982

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 AMS 465-8-12

Transcript:

City Point, Va. Jan. 25th 1865

Maj. Gen. Halleck, Washington,

I do not want to draw any troops from Washington that cannot be well spared. I will garrison the Forts on Cape Fear with Heavy Artillerists from here.

I will not leave Hampton Roads until Friday morning. It’s probable the Asst. Sec. of the Navy will accompany me. If so Schofield can leave Washington with him to-morrow evening. Answer if I shall wait for them.

U. S. Grant

Lt. Gen.

 

Citation: Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), autograph letter signed to Henry W. Halleck. City Point, Va.; 25 January 1865. AMs 435/8.12

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Transcript (excerpt):

“Habeas Corpus”

“In the Rebel House of Representative, on January 20th, the resolution against suspending the habeas corpus was voted down-43 to 26.

If we would have peace we must first gain victories. The army must have more men and new and better organization. This is the only work for congress to do. Let them do it and do it quickly. Turn peace over to Mr. Blair and Mr. Foote. Let them hob-knob over it to their heart’s content, and whether this side or the other of the Potomac makes no matter. War and war measure for the Congress of this Confederacy is the only thing now left for our Legislatures.”

 

Citation: Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia, 24 January 1865. Gift of Steven and Susan Raab. AN .P5546

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AMs 774-18 Ulysses S Grant to Henry W Halleck

Transcript:

Head Quarters Armies of the United States

City Point, Va, Jan. 23d 1865

Maj. Gen. Halleck, Washington

Order Maher to Alexandria. We will send Schofields Corps first and add this detachment to it until such time as it can be got to Sherman. It is too late now for it to reach Sherman from Pocotaligo.

U.S. Grant

Lt. Gen.

 

Citation: Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), autograph letter signed to Henry W. Halleck. City Point, Va., 23 January 1865. AMs 774/18

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

AMs 1168-11 1865-01-22

Transcript:

Received at Mobile Jany 22nd 1865

By telegraph from Montgomery 22 to Genl G T Beauregard

Genl Taylor deported last night about twenty five hundred white and six thousand negro troops reported to be at New Orleans on fourth or fifth=an army corps said to be from Thomas army went down Mississippi on fourteen transports destination believed to be Mobile.

Geo Wm Brent Col. & A.A.G.

 

Citation: George W. Brent , telegram to G. T. Beauregard. Montgomery, Ala; 22 January 1865. AMs 1168/11

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AMs 774-16 Ulysses S Grant to Edward Ord and Meade

Transcript:

Head Quarters Armies of the United States,

City Point, Va. Jany 20th 1865

Maj Gens. Ord & Meade,

I leave at 12 for Washington. Will remain there but a few hours. During my absence be prepared to take the offensive if it should be found that the enemy are drawing off any considerable portion of their troops, an event not impossible though which is not likely within the limits of my absence.

U.S. Grant

Lt. Gen.

 

Citation: Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), autograph letter signed to Edward O.C. Ord and George G. Meade. City Point, Va.; 20 January 1865. AMs 774/16

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Telegram 1-19-65 Maury to Brent 10 mp

Transcript:

Received at Jan 19 1865

By telegraph from Mobile 19 To Col Geo Wm Brent

Cannot possibly spare the troops at present. hope they will be allowed to remain.

D H Maury

Maj Genl

14.470

Citation: Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900), telegram to George William Brent. Mobile, Ala.; 19 January 1865. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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