The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (29)

 

  Transcript:

There was an old lady of Venezuela,

So ill that no physician could heal her,

She called her kind “nuss”

“A sleepy old cuss,”

This morbid old lady of Venezuela.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

Share

Rev. John Riddle Warner was the grandfather of the poet Marianne Moore and during the Civil War, he lived in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Mary Craig Eyster was his sister-in-law, who lived in Chambersburg. These letters are preserved as part of Marianne Moore’s family papers. 

 Moore VI-6-7 p1 letter to John from Mary Eyster 7-28-64 300 dpi Moore VI-6-7 p2 letter to John from Mary Eyster 7-28-64 300 dpi

Transcript [excerpt]

Chambersburg July 28th / 64

Dear Brother,

[…] It is now half-past six o’clock a.m. Mary seems better this morning but not well, will give her the oil. I suppose you will come over if there is any danger of the rebels coming. hope you will be sure to bring your trunk with you, am more anxious to have you as Mary is not well – don’t know what the news is this morning but there must have been some thing very important last night as the major sent for his blankets expecting to stay at the office all night – he is in his room now, don’t know what time he came. There has not been much excitement here – we feel a little safer as Headquarters are here, we have more reliable information than if they were not here. We expect George home tonight. I am as ever yours

Mary

:

 

Citation: Mary Craig Eyster, autograph letter signed to John Riddle Warner.  Chambersburg, Pa.; 28 July 1864. Moore VI:06:07

Share

 AMs 354-17 p1 US Grant to george Meade 300 dpi AMs 354-17 p2-3 US Grant to george Meade 300 dpi

 

Sent 8.10 p.m.

City Point Va. July 27th 1864

Maj. Gen. Meade,

The enemy only commenced about two hours ago reinforcing Richmond from Petersburg. 29 carloads of troops have been seen to pass the junction within that time. This will make any surprise on Richmond impossible and may prevent our cavalry reaching the railroad. I will have this dispatch repeated to Gen. Hancock and let him do what he can in the morning in the way of turning the enemy and driving him from his present position. After that he will be best able to determine whether it will be well to push further.

U. S. Grant

 

Citation: Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), autograph letter signed to George G. Meade. City Point, Va; 27 July 1864. AMs 354/17

Share

The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (28)

 

  Transcript:

There once were five women of Wells,

Who thought themselves terrible belles:

They never could walk but the people would talk,

And dilate on these beauties of Wells.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

Share

The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (27)

 

  Transcript:

There came a young lady from Hayti, whose complexion was rather too slaty

Whose hair was too curled, and yet the gay world,

Paid court to this lady from Hayti

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

Share

The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (26)

 

  Transcript:

There was a young man with a rose,

Who said to his girl, “I suppose

That this gift is as pretty as my love she is witty-“

So she courtesied, and forthwith a rose.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

Share

The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (25)

 

  Transcript:

There was an old party in Rome,

Who kept a house in a very fine dome,

With a spavined old bull

That no longer could pull

The coach of this party in Rome.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

Share

The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (24)

 

  Transcript:

There was a young man of Lancaster,

Who walked ever faster and faster,

Till though he began

By walking, he ran

And galloped all over Lancaster.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

Share

The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (23)

 

  Transcript:

There was a young person in Maine,

Who, although undeniably plain,

Was possessed of such “chic”

That before she could speak,

“she did for” the “male sect” in Maine.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

Share

Henry and Mary Warner lived in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, now part of Pittsburgh. They are the great-grandparents of poet Marianne Moore.  By the 1860s they had three surviving children:  John, Henry, and Anne. Their letters to John, a Presbyterian minister living in Gettysburg, are preserved as part of Marianne Moore’s family papers.

 Moore VI-6-7 p1 letter to John from Henry and Mary 7-20-64 300 dpi Moore VI-6-7 p2 letter to John from Henry and Mary 7-20-64 300

Transcript [excerpt]:

Allegheny City Wednesday July 20 1864 Afternoon

Dear John, […] We sincerely hope when you receive this, that yourself & Baby may be in the enjoyment of good health and that you and all the folks in your country have got over the scare of rebel invasion; It grieves us [as?] should grieve every loyal person when we think of millions of property being carried off by the most wicked of wicked creatures under the sun We are informed not less than 8000 horses have been carried off to Virginia and now we are sorry to say, according to a writer signing himself Druid the rebels have by no means given up the idea of attacking Washington. We rejoice you have so far escaped and that you found your carpet sack [&?] safe at the Depot. Dr. J.B. Clark leaves this place as Captain of a Comp’y of 110 men for the front this day to protect the border, people in this county are straining every effort to raise men and money. May the Most High interfere in our behalf against traitors at home and abroad, in England and every where else and bring us safe through this terrible ordeal; The heat here is oppressive, and the long continued drought causes our farmers to be very desponding; Your letter to us we gladly received, and you may be sure interested us very much – according to request we inform you the carriage on trunk was $2 25/100. You say you long to see us, to talk matters and things over, you do not long to see us more than we do to see you and Baby. May the Mighty God of Jacob bless you and yours, in the sincere prayer of

Your affectionate father & mother

Henry & Mary Warner

 

Citation: Henry and Mary Warner, autograph letter signed to John Riddle Warner.  Allegheny City [Pittsburgh],20 July 1864. Moore VI:06:7

Share