Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This telegram is part of The Telegraphic History of the Civil War; a compiled album of telegrams to Beauregard from Davis, Lee, Johnston and others.

Telegram 11-27-64 Beauregard to Brent 10 mp

Transcript:

Received at Nov 27 186 at 1 o’clock 45 minutes

By telegraph from Macon 27 To Col G W Brent

Chf of Staff

Maj Genl Martins care will be attended to soon as poss I return to Montgomery. I intend to reorganizing Wheelers cavalry soon as practicable. Sherman was at Saundersville moving in direction of Central Railroad.

G T Beauregard

Genl

32 wpd

 

 

Citation:G.T. Beauregard, telegram to Dabney Herndon Maury. Macon, Ga, 27 November 1864. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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Telegram 11-26-64 Maury to Brent 10 mp Transcript:

Received at Nov 26 1864

By telegraph from Mobile 26 To Col G W Brent

Two thousand more pr of shoes will supply our present wants The Leather was intended for the manufacture of shoes –

D H Maury

Maj Gen

211-400 V

 

Citation: Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900), telegram to George William Brent. Mobile, Ala.; 26 November 1864. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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Telegram 11-25-64 Maury to Brent 10 mp

Transcript:

Received at Nov 25 1864

By telegraph from Mobile 25 To ColG W Brent

A A G

The following just rec’d = Holly Springs November 24th = Memphis scouts reports all forces at Memphis gone up River except the negroes Nashville Gazette says Shermans force Consists of Army of Tennessee under Howard & Slocum’s corps = force under Thomas Consists of the Five [illeg.] Corps & Large Detachments of other Corps

Signed R H Bonner Hendersons scouts

D H Maury

Maj Gen Comdg

56-1120 DN

Citation: Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900), telegram to George William Brent. Mobile, Ala.; 25 November 1864. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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Telegram 11-24-64 Maury to Brent 10 mp

Transcript:

Received at Nov 24 1864

By telegraph from Mobile 24 To Col G W Brent

A A G

In view of interrupted communication with Richmond shall officers of Depts of Supplies wait for the usual orders from there and issue the necessary supplies upon the order of Departmental Commander =

D H Maury

Maj Gen

31-620 pd

 

Citation: Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900), telegram to George William Brent. Mobile, Ala.; 24 November 1864. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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Telegram 11-23-64 Maury to Brent 10 mp

Transcript:

Received at Nov 24 1864

By telegraph from Mobile 24 To Col G W Brent

A A G

Enemy in force Reached Big block Bridge from vicksburg Early yesterday morning = Gen. Gardner will be at Jackson tomorrow have called on Gov Clark for assistance

D H Maury Maj Gen

Comdg

Citation: Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900), telegram to George William Brent. Mobile, Ala.; 23 November 1864. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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Confederate Lt. General Richard Taylor was the son of President Zachary Taylor. By 1864 he was in command of the Department of Alabama and Mississippi.

Telegram 11-22-64 Maury to Taylor 10 mp

Transcript:

Received at Montgy Nov 22 1864

By telegraph from Mobile 22 Nov To Lt. Genl. Taylor

F P E T C X X V N – N T H A – N Y T F M V F X L – J G M G M – report attack on Mobile in contemplation – force at Pensacola now to be P Z E T H – F N Z Y K E I L – & more expected my scouts report large encampment recently set up near Fort Morgan – R K I V C O Q Q – T C K X N – O P C M – F V G P T A G N I I B U – reserves militia or other L P E R – T P D T – T J – I P N A K U Z V – my – C H T Q R E . U O I O N V T Z – now – N M N F – F N Z Y K E I L – C G R – V G I V F N – P M Z L O – is it possible to get militia from Gov Clarke of Mississippi – Will you go to O G H F X G C –

D H Maury

Maj Genl

9?n 1840 Q B

(Decoded)

Deserters from Farragut’s fleet report attack on Mobile in contemplation_ force at Pensacola now to be Eight thousand, and more expected_ My scouts report large encampment recently set up near Fort Morgan_ Prudence urges that reinforcements – reserves, militia or other sent here if possible_ My effective total now four thousand and eighty eight_ Is it possible to get militia from Gov Clarke of Mississippi? Will you go to Georgia?

(sgn) D H Maury

Maj Genl _

Mobile, Nov 22, 64_

To Lt. Genl R Taylor

Montgomery, Ala

Citation: Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900), telegram to Richard Taylor. Mobile, Ala.; 22 November 1864. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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20060994

Possibly Hyman Polock Rosenbach (born 1858)

 

Backmark: “F. GUTEKUNST/PHOTOGRAPHER/704 & 706 Arch St./PHILADA.”

 

Citation: Frederick Gutekunst, carte de visite of unidentified sitter. Philadelphia, n.d. 2006.994

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

AMs 1168-11 1864-11-18 AMs 1168-11 1864-11-18 verso

Transcript:

Corinth Nov 18 1864

To Genl Beauregard

We are ordered by Lt Genl Taylor to keep Selma Meridian Jackson & Tuscumbia offices open all night for benefit of military business. We can dispatch to these offices at any time tonight. Yankee raid from Baton Rouge & Natchez in two columns reached NOP & GHRR this evening at Brook Haven & Hazelhurst South of Jackson do not know force

Very respectfully

Jno B Morris

Major

Citation: John B. Morris, telegram to G.T. Beauregard. Corinth, Miss; 18 November 1864. AMs 1168/11

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Rev. John Riddle Warner was the grandfather of the poet Marianne Moore and during the Civil War, he lived in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Mary Craig Eyster was his sister-in-law, who lived in Chambersburg. These letters are preserved as part of Marianne Moore’s family papers.

Moore VI-6-11 Mary to John Riddle Warner 11-17-64

Transcript:

Chambersburg, Nov. 17th/64

Dear Brother,

It is now after ten o’clock and I cannot write much. I intended to write early in the evening but was prevented by company. I had a letter from Martha to-day saying that Mother has not been well for some time, and is very anxious to see me—I expect to go up to-morrow, dont know when I’ll return, will write you from there. There has been some talk here about the rebels coming but I believe it is all over now. The citizens here have organized—they have raised three company’s. I suppose you have heard that we are going to lose Mr Nicolls he is going to the second church St. Louis Mo. On next Sabbath Mr Hays declared the pulpit vacant. What time do you think of going to Pittsburg? Sallie says tell you she sends Mary Warner a kiss. The children would like very much to have her with them. Caroline sent me a blanket—we have a plenty to do us this winter—dont require so much sleeping in a warm room. Hettie & Ariana are to be home next week

Yours in haste

Mary

Citation: Mary Craig Eyster, autograph letter signed to John Riddle Warner.  Chambersburg, Pa.; 17 November 1864. Moore VI:06:11

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

AMs 1168-11 1864-11-15

Transcript:

Tuscumbia, Nov 15 1864

From Meridian Nov 15

To Col Geo Wm Brent A. A. G.

Carpenter & Blacksmith sent to Maj Whitfield fourteenth inst.

C. McGovern

Maj & Chf QM

 

Citation: C. McGovern, telegram to George William Brent. Tuscumbia, 15 November 1864. AMs 1168/11

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