Henry and Mary Warner lived in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, now part of Pittsburgh. They are the great-grandparents of poet Marianne Moore.  By the 1860s they had three surviving children:  John, Henry, and Anne. Their letters to John, a Presbyterian minister living in Gettysburg, are preserved as part of Marianne Moore’s family papers. 

 Moore VI-6-8 p1 letter to John from Henry and Mary 8-31-64 300 dpi Moore VI-6-8 p2 letter to John from Henry and Mary 8-31-64 300 dpi

Transcript:

Allegheny City, Wednesday, August 31, 1864 Afternoon

Dear John, With pleasure we inform you that about 3 OClock P.M. yesterday, Henry arrived on a furlough of ten days from the time he left the fort until his return to the same place, he looks extremely well, and is in excellent health; Your welcome letter reached us on Monday morning 29th Inst. We were very glad to know that Mrs Eyster and the three dear children arrived in G. safely, we sympathize very deeply with you all, we are in great hopes the rebels will never trouble you again, but if they should, make no stay but come on in good time, don’t mind the trouble of the children, and we will do the best we can for you all. We both laughed when we read what little Mary said about the rebels burning her fine dresses, we say, keep up your hearts as none of you perished in the flames, if one of the children suffered death in that way it would be worse than all the loss you have sustained; When two years of Henry’s time had expired which was the 22nd of this month, he offer’d the Gen’l his resignation but the Gen’l would not accept I – so H. concluded to stop, and received the furlough. The Gen’l said he was of too much use to the Government, and could not be spared, and gave him the furlough; We are all well, with the exception of poor Anne, she has had poor health since she returned from Uncle Maxwells, but is going about the house; Mother says she will get the flannel and the muslin and make the babys things with a great deal of pleasure; Was MacDowel Sharps house burned? Give our best respects to Mrs Eyster, we were very glad to hear that Mr Eysters trunk was saved, that was so much, although little, still it was a fortunate circumstance, also Mrs Eysters watch and your own. The E. family loss was terribly severe surely. Your affectionate father & mother

Henry & Mary Warner

 

 

Citation: Henry and Mary Warner, autograph letter signed to John Riddle Warner.  Allegheny City [Pittsburgh],31 August 1864. Moore VI:06:8

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The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (46)

 

  Transcript:

There was a stout lady of Boston,

Whose clothes looked as if they were tossed;

But her boots were so tight, that to get them on right,

They had to be taken and forced on.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

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The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (45)

 

  Transcript:

There was a sweet girl of Kingessing, whose actions were truly distressing;

For she sat on the pump

And threw knives at a stump,

An appearance not quite prepossessing.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

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The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (44)

 

  Transcript:

There was an old crazy perfumer,

Who took for his wife a young “Bloomer;”

He wished a new scent, so, on roasting intent,

He said it would pay to consume her.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

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The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (43)

 

  Transcript:

There was a prodigious young fop, dressed to kill from the foot to the top:

All the girls at the Fair

Could do nothing but stare,

And keep clear of that killing young fop.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

Share

The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (43)

 

  Transcript:

There was a prodigious young fop, dressed to kill from the foot to the top:

All the girls at the Fair

Could do nothing but stare,

And keep clear of that killing young fop.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

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AMs 357-28 p1 U.S. Grant to George G. Meade

Transcript:

City Point Va. Aug. 26th / 64

Maj. Gen. Meade, Copy to Gen. Ord.

You are authorized at all times until further orders to assume command and direct the movement of all troops operating against Petersburg South of the Appomattox.

U. S. Grant

Lt. Gen.

Citation: Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), autograph letter signed to George G. Meade. City Point, Va., 26 August 1864. AMs 357/28

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Henry and Mary Warner lived in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, now part of Pittsburgh. They are the great-grandparents of poet Marianne Moore.  By the 1860s they had three surviving children:  John, Henry, and Anne. Their letters to John, a Presbyterian minister living in Gettysburg, are preserved as part of Marianne Moore’s family papers. 

 Moore VI-6-8 p1 letter to John from Henry and Mary 8-25-64 300 dpi Moore VI-6-8 p2 letter to John from Henry and Mary 8-25-64 300 dpi

Transcript:

Allegheny City, Wednesday, August 25, 1864 Afternoon

Dear John, This letter is dictated by your Mother. We are very much concerned about you and your little affairs, from last nights news, we fear that the rebels are going back to you, and it is only the Most High knows where they are going to stop. We think the best thing you can do, is to fix up your affairs and come on here, and just stay here and content yourself until we can see further, and if Mrs Eyster and her children were to come on, we would receive them gladly, we fear that in consequence of the state of affairs in Indiana and other places that there will be much bloodshed at the North, the copper heads are very numerous and very bitter, they are opposing the draft as much as they can, but they are not opposing it here, as far as we know, if you have any time at all answer this as soon as you receive it. If Mrs Eyster is with you give our love to her

Your affectionate father & mother

Henry & Mary Warner

 

Citation: Henry and Mary Warner, autograph letter signed to John Riddle Warner.  Allegheny City [Pittsburgh],25 August 1864. Moore VI:06:8

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Henry and Mary Warner lived in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, now part of Pittsburgh. They are the great-grandparents of poet Marianne Moore.  By the 1860s they had three surviving children:  John, Henry, and Anne. Their letters to John, a Presbyterian minister living in Gettysburg, are preserved as part of Marianne Moore’s family papers. Moore VI-6-8 p1 letter to John from Henry and Mary 8-24-64 300 dpi Moore VI-6-8 p2 letter to John from Henry and Mary 8-24-64 300 dpi

Transcript:

Allegheny City, Wednesday, August 24, 1864 Afternoon

Dear John, These dreary, & gloomy times, while our border is threatened with another ‘raid’ we send you our usual Wednesday epistle; your father did not feel very well this morning, in consequence of a slight attack of diahorea, however he made an effort to visit the P.O., with no success but merely to look into an empty box; Anne was quite unwell last week, had three teeth extracted, is now much better. Mother saw her, the two children, & Charlotte in market yesterday morning; Robert seems to be doing very well. Mr. Temple has advanced his salary 1 ½ $ per week. Mother thinks he is in a deep consumption; we had a letter from Henry on Monday morning, it was short, he is hearty and well; we hope Mrs Eyster & family are well, our dear little Mary, and yourself; If it was so ordered in Providence, we would like to be nearer you than we are, or that you were nearer us; Our markets are abundantly supplied with vegetables, and farmers, and gardeners, are striving to ma[i]ntain their fruits with all their might; we are glad to think things are no worse; Is Mrs Eyster and the children with you, Was Mr. Sharpe’s house burned? There is nothing going on here but recruiting for the army, we suppose we need not look for you while these rebel raids threaten the southern border of Pennsylvania; We live in hopes that both you and ourselves may live to see a speedy and happy termination to this sad state of affairs; nothing is impossible to the Most High and it is in his power soon and sudden to bring order out of confusion when least expected, although we sinners have brought on the confusion

Your affectionate father & mother

Henry & Mary Warner

 

Citation: Henry and Mary Warner, autograph letter signed to John Riddle Warner.  Allegheny City [Pittsburgh],124 August 1864. Moore VI:06:8

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The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (42)

 

  Transcript:

There was a young person of Leers,

Who had such a long pair of ears,

That the people who’d pass,

Deemed him more an ass,

Than even the donkeys of Leers.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

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