AMs 357-30 p1 U.S. Grant to Benjamin F. Butler

Transcript:

City Point Va. Sept. 21st / 64

Maj. Gen. Butler,

Further news from Sheridan is better than the first we heard. In pressuring the enemy up the Valley Lee may be inclined to detach from here. Put every one on the lookout for any movement of the enemy. Should any forced be detached we must either manage to bring them back or gain an advantage here.

U. S. Grant

Lt. Gen.

 

Citation: Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), autograph letter signed to Benjamin F. Butler. City Point, Va., 21 September 18]64. AMs 357/30

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20061488

Backmark: “F. GUTEKUNST/Photographer/No. 704 & 706 Arch St.  /PHILADA”

 

Citation: Frederick Gutekunst, photograph of unidentified Rosenbach relative. Philadelphia, 1863-65. 2006.1488

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

 

1168-11 1864-9-17

Transcript:

Greensboro, Sept 17th 1864

To Col Geo Brent

Chf of Gen Beauregards Staff

Genl. Beauregard will be in Danville in the morning eight (8) o clock, and leave for Petersburg.

S.R. Chisolm

Maj + QM

 

Citation:S.R. Chisolm, telegram to George W. Brent. Greensboro, 17 September 1864. AMs 1168/11

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20061911

Backmark: “F. GUTEKUNST/Photographer/704 & 706 Arch St./PHILADA”

 

Citation: Frederick Gutekunst, carte de visite of Elizabeth Sophia Binswanger. Philadelphia, 1863-1865. 2006.1911

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

 

This telegram is from The Telegraphic History of the Civil War; a compiled album of telegrams to Beauregard from Davis, Lee, Johnston and others.

Telegram 9-14-64 Lee to Beauregard 10 mp

Transcript:

Received at Wilmington Sept 14 1864

By telegraph from Richmond 13 To Gen G T Beauregard

Are the batteries at Confederate point ready for the rifle guns to be sent from here or when will they be?

R E Lee

21/791 cc

 

Citation:Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), telegram to G.T. Beauregard. Richmond, 14 September 1864. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (53)

 

  Transcript:

My good Southern Brother look here, one thing to my mind is quite clear-

If we put out this Furness, it no longer will burn us,

Nor warm little darkies up here.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

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The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (52)

 

  Transcript:

There was a bold painter who said, “I will paint such a wonderful head,

That I’ll make the whole Fair, with astonishment stare

When they see this miraculous head.”

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

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The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (51)

 

  Transcript:

There was a young lady of Rittenhouse Square,

Attacked by a worm as she went to the Fair,

But a champion brave was destined to save,

This frightened young lady of Rittenhouse Square.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

 

This telegram is from The Telegraphic History of the Civil War; a compiled album of telegrams to Beauregard from Davis, Lee, Johnston and others.

Telegram 9-10-64 Lee to Beauregard 10 mp

Transcript:

Received at Wilmington Sept 10 1864

Telegraph from Dunns Hill 10 To Genl G T Beauregard

Are there any guns not required at Wilmington suitable for defence of James River

R E Lee

111/3 74 c

 

Citation:Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), telegram to G.T. Beauregard. 10 September 1864. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (50)

 

  Transcript:

There was an old man of Carlisle, who left the rebels in style;

For said he “I will flee,

I never liked Lee,

And someday I’ll come back to Carlisle.”

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

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