Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

 

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

AMs 1168-11 1865-03-02

 

Transcript:

Received at Augusta March 2 1865 at 1 o’clock 30 minutes

By telegraph from Macon 2 To G W Brent A.A.G.

Am detained here on account of pontoon bridge at oconee being washed away expect to be able to leave tomorrow.

Alfred Roman

Lt. Col. & ADG

 

Citation:Alfred Roman, telegram to George W. Brent. Macon, Ga.; 2 March 1865. AMs 1168/11

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

 

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

AMs 1168-11 1865-03-01

 

Transcript:

Received at Augusta Mch 1st 1865 at 2 o’clock 30 minutes

By telegraph from Macon To Col. GW Brent A.A.G.

The impressments of iron of Macon & Brunswick R.R. will be resisted by injunction &c is it the intention of the General to enforce the impressments as ordered.

J.B. Eustis A.A.G.

 

Citation:J.B. Eustis, telegram to George W. Brent. Macon, Ga.; 1 March 1865. AMs 1168/11

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AMS 360-12 p1 Wade Hampton reply to William T. Sherman AMS 360-12 p2 Wade Hampton reply to William T. Sherman AMS 360-12 p3 Wade Hampton reply to William T. Sherman

Transcript:

Headquarters

In the Field. 27 February 1865

Majr Genl W. T. Sherman

U. S. Army.

General. –

Your communication of the 24th just reached me today. You state that it has been officially reported that your foraging parties are “murdered” after capture. Also you go on to say that you have “ordered a similar number of prisoners in our hands to be disposed of in like manner.” That is to say – you have ordered a number of Confederate soldiers to be “murdered.”

You characterize your order in proper terms; for the public voice even in your own country where it seldom dares to express itself in vindication of truth, honor or justice will surely agree with you in pronouncing you guilty of murder, in your order is carried out.

Before discussing this portion of your letter, I beg to assure you, that for every soldier of mine “murdered” by you I shall have executed at once two of yours giving in all causes preference to any officers who may be in my hands.

In reference to the statement you you make regarding the death of your foragers I have only to say that I know nothing of it; that no orders given by me authorize the killing of prisoners after capture, also that I do not believe my men killed any of yours except under circumstances in which it was perfectly legitimate and proper that they should kill them.

It is a part of the system of the thieves whom you designate as your foragers to fire the dwellings of those citizens whom they have robbed. To check this inhuman system, which is justly execrated by every civilized nation, I have directed my men to shoot down all of your men who are caught burning houses. This order shall remain in force, as long as you disgrace the profession of arms by allowing your men to destroy private dwellings.

You say that I cannot, of course, question your right to forage on the country “ It is a right as old as History” I do not, Sir, question this right. But there is a right older even that this, also one more inalienable, the right that every man as to defend his home, and to protect those who are dependant on him. And from my hear I wish that every old man and boy in my country who can fire a gun would shoot down, as he would a wild beast, the men who are desolating their land, burning their houses, and insulting their women.

You are particular in defining and claiming “war rights.” May I ask if you enumerate amongst them the right to fire upon a defenseless city without notice, to burn that city to the ground after it had been surrendered by the authorities who claimed though in vain, that protection which is always accorded in civilized warfare to non-combatants to fire the dwelling houses of citizens after robbing them also to perpetrate even darker crimes than these, crimes too black to enumerated?

You have permitted if you have not ordered the commission of these offences against humanity and the rules of war. You fired into the city of Columbia without a word of warning after its surrender by the mayor who demanded protection to private property you laid the whole city in ashes, leaving amid its ruins thousands of old men and helpless women and children who are likely to perish of starvation and exposure. Your line of march can be traced by the lurid light of burning houses and in more than one household there is now an agony far more bitter than that of death.

The Indian scalped his victim regardless of sex or age but with all his barbarity he always respected the persons of his female captives, Your soldiers, more savage than the Indians, insult these whose natural protectors are absent.

In conclusion I have only to request that whenever you have any of my men “disposed of” or “murdered” for the terms appear to be synonymous with you, you will let me hear of it in order that I may know what action to take in the matter on the meanwhile I shall hold fifty-six of your men as hostages for those whom you have ordered to be executed.

I am yours &c

Wade Hampton

Lt. Gen.

Citation: Wade Hampton, letter to William T. Sherman. 27 February 1865. AMs 360/12

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 AMS 358-7 p1 U.S. Grant to Edwin M. Stanton AMS 358-7 p2 U.S. Grant to Edwin M. Stanton

Transcript:

(Cipher)

City Point, Va, Feb; 25th 1865

Hon. E. M. Stanton, Sec. of War, Washington.

I am very much pleased with the interest Commodore Radford seems to take in his duties and the way he talks. Adml. Farragut can tell better than I can how he will do when danger comes. The Probabilities of an attack from the Rebel Navy in the first rise in the river is anticipated and every preparation made to deceive it. I have not the slightest apprehension about the result and rather desire it. We are far differently prepared now, both on land and water, from what we were the last time the Rebel Iron Clads came down.

I think we must very soon use either Adml. Farragut or Porter in capturing Galveston. It will be but a very short time I hope before we will be able to spare the troops for this purpose from here or from Cape Fear River.

U.S. Grant

Lt. Gen.

 

Citation: Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), autograph letter signed to Edwin M. Stanton. City Point, Va.; 25 February 1865. AMs 358/7

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  AMS 465-8-6 p1  AMS 465-8-6 p2

Transcript:

City Point, Va. Feb. 25th 1865

 

Maj. Gen. Schofield,

Fortress Monroe,

Do not hesitate about making any changes in commanders you may think necessary. I supposed Palmer had Kinston before this. I think by all means you should get Goldsboro and hold and supply it as soon as possible. If you hear information of Sherman coming in at any other point you will of course want to meet him with supplies. I take it that whilst you are moving on Goldsboro a small force will protect supplies sent to Fayetteville or elsewhere. If he should come to Fayetteville you could send supplies after his arrival there. Prepare to send supplies forward to Fayetteville the moment you know Sherman is coming in there.

U. S. Grant

Lt. Gen.

 

Citation: Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), autograph letter signed to John McAllister Schofield. City Point, Va.; 25 February 1865. AMs 435/8.6

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AMS 360-12 p1 William T. Sherman with Wade Hampton AMS 360-12 p2 William T. Sherman with Wade Hampton AMS 360-12 p3 William T. Sherman with Wade Hampton

Transcript:

Headquarters, Military Division of the Mississippi,

In the Field. Feb 24 1865

Lt Genl Wade Hampton

Comdg Cavalry forces. C. S. A.

General.

It is officially reported to me that our foraging parties are murdered after capture and labeled “Death to All Foragers”. One instance of a Liut and seven men near Chesterville, and another of twenty “near a Ravine 80 rods from the main road” about 3 miles from Feasterville. I have ordered a similar number of prisoners in our hand to be disposed of in like manner.

I hold about 1000 of prisoners cap-tured in various ways. And can stand it as long as you. But I hardly think these murders are committed with your knowledge. And would suggest that you give notice to the people at large that every life taken by them simply results in the death of one of your Confederates.

Of course you cannot question my right to “forage on the Country”. It is a war Right as old as History. The manner of exacting in various with circumstances. And if the Civil Authorities will supply my Requisitions I will forbid all foraging. But I find no Civil Authorities who can respond to calls for forage or provision. And therefore must collect directly of the People. I have no doubt this is the occasion of much misbehavior an the part of our men, but I cannot permit an enemy to judge, or punish with wholesale murder.

Personally I regret the bitter feelings engendered by this war: but they are to be expected, and I simply allege that those who struck the first blow and made war inevitable ought not in fairness to reproach us for the natural consequences. I merely assert our War Right to Forage. And my resolve to protect my foragers to the extent of Life for Life.

I am with respect

Your obt servant

W. T. Sherman

Maj. Genl.

U.S.A.

Citation: William T. Sherman (1820-1891), autograph letter signed to Wade Hampton. 24 February 1864. AMs 360/12

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This telegram is from The Telegraphic History of the Civil War; a compiled album of telegrams to Beauregard from Davis, Lee, Johnston and others.

Telegram 2-23-65 Lee to Beauregard 10 mp

Transcript:

Dispatched by Telegraph from Head Qrs A.N. Va 23rd Feby 1865

To Genl Beauregard – Chester

If enemy turns east McLaws will be in danger. Hasten him forward also mass all troops in your rear to retard and embarrass enemy until you can bring them forward.

 

Citation:Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), telegram to G.T. Beauregard. 23 February 1865. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This telegram is from The Telegraphic History of the Civil War; a compiled album of telegrams to Beauregard from Davis, Lee, Johnston and others.

 Telegram 2-22-65 (1) Lee to Beauregard 10 mp

Transcript:

Head Qrs 22 via [RL?]

Genl Beauregard

Your troops cannot I fear reach you through Wilmington. Instruct them as to their route

R. E. Lee

 

Citation:Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), telegram to G.T. Beauregard. 22 February 1865. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

AMs 358-23 p2 Beauregard G. T. to Jefferson Davis 

Transcript:

Telegram to Pres’t. Davis

Chesterville S. C.

February July 21/65

G. T. Beauregard

General

Relative to the capture of Washington. Urgent request for concentration of troops

Chesterville S. C. Feby 21/65

8h am

President JeffDavis

Richmond Va

Should enemy advance into N. C. towards Charlotte & Salisbury as is now almost certain, I earnestly urge a concentration in time of at least 35,000 Infantry & artillery at latter point if possible to give him battle there & crush him. Then to concentrate all forces against Grant & then to march on Washington to dictate peace. Hurden & myself can collect about 15,000, exclusive of Cheathams & Stewarts Corps, not likely to reach in time – if Lee & Bragg could furnish 20,000 more at the fate of the Confederacy would be secure.

G. T. Beauregard

 

Citation: G. T. Beauregard (1818-1893), autograph telegram signed to Jefferson Davis. Chesterville, S.C.; 21 Feb.1865. Ams 358/23

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AMS 358-6 p1 U.S. Grant to Phillip H. Sheridan AMS 358-6 p2 U.S. Grant to Phillip H. Sheridan

Transcript:

(Cipher)

Head Quarters Armies of the United States

City Point, Va, Feb; 20th 1865

Maj. Gen. Sherridan, Winchester Va.

As soon as it is possible to travel I think you will have no difficulty about reaching Lynchburg with a Cavalry force alone. From there you could destroy the railroad and Canal in every direction as to be of no further use to the rebellion this coming Spring or, I believe, during the existence of the rebellion. Sufficient Cavalry should be left behind to look after Mosby’s gang. From Lynchburg, if information you might get there would justify it, you could strike South, heading the streams in Virginia to the Westward of Danville, and push in and join Sherman. This additional raid with one now about starting from East Tennessee under Stoneman numbering four or five thousand Cavalry, one from Vicksburg numbering seven or eight thousand Cavalry, one from East Port Miss ten thousand Cavy. and Canby from Mobile Bay with about thirty eight thousand mixed troops, the three latter pushing for Tuscaloosa, Selma & Montgomery, and Sherman with a large army eating out the vitals of South Carolina, is all that will be wanted to leave nothing for the Rebellion to stand upon. I would advise you to overcome great obsticles to accomplish this. Charleston was evacuated on Tuesday last.

U. S. Grant

Lt. Gen.

Citation: Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), autograph letter signed to Philip H. Sheridan. City point, Va; 20 February 1865. AMs 358/6

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