Henry and Mary Warner lived in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, now part of Pittsburgh. They are the great-grandparents of poet Marianne Moore.  By the 1860s they had three surviving children:  John, Henry, and Anne. Their letters to John, a Presbyterian minister living in Gettysburg, are preserved as part of Marianne Moore’s family papers. 

 Moore VI-6-10 p1 Henry and Mary Warner to John Riddle Warner 10-19-64 Moore VI-6-10 p2 Henry and Mary Warner to John Riddle Warner 10-19-64

Transcript:

Allegheny City, Wednesday, October 19, 1864 Afternoon

Dear John—Mary is hearty & well, Mother and Anne & your little ducky were over in town this forenoon, Anne dined with us, and is now seated beside me, giving the result of their journey over to town; All three took the passenger cars, went first to White Orr & Co, and selected a very handsome green plaid with a red stripe in it, to make her a sack for the winter, it is to be trimmed with red silk cord and red silk buttons to match it, made double breasted like a mens coat and two rows of the red buttons down the front & pockets trimmed with the red cord & buttons, it is to be made in Whites store in the latest style; One of the young ladies in store put on her a sack of this kind, and you would be astonished how highly delighted Mary was with it, putting her hands in the pockets &c &c, it is to be lined for winter, there were several young ladies in the store, they were very much interested in her childish prattle, with her conversation about the dirty rebels burning her best dress, she talked that loud she could be heard all over the store, The sack becomes her very much, more so than the cloak, Mother bought her a very nice pair of gloves that fits very well, they are warm silk ones for winter, drab colour; the sack that is making at Whites is to be nine dollars (9$) and is to be ready on Saturday. A little hood was ordered also at a fancy store on 4th street, it is to be knit of blue & grey chinchilla, zephyr worsted, and to be ready by Saturday night, a round comb to go across the top of her head was also purchased. Last night Mary slept at 262 Jackson St, her Aunt Anne took her away yesterday morning, she enjoys herself there very much with the children, while writing this letter she was standing here beside us looking at the album and the different likenesses she knew all the likenesses, and when she came to her papa’s, she was asked who that was?, that is my pap’a and he ‘lubs’ me, your likeness was among some others that Mother was shewing her; We will all take her out as much as we possibly can, Anne says it is one of the greatest pleasures she has to take her out wherever she goes, or to be with her—she was at church last Sabbath once, as we had only meeting in the forenoon she remained at home in the afternoon, she behaved very well, she is now battering the pillow on the lounge & says she is making the bed, Grandma said to her last Sabbath night what will you do if the rebels come here and burn us out, she shook her head and with much vehemence said “I would ‘pit’ upon them” meaning (spit) grand ma laughed hearty at the expression, at this very moment she is amusing us highly about ‘Whetting’ battering the pillow on the lounge Grandma says are you whetting, she answers just feel my face;

Your affectionate father & mother Henry & Mary Warner

 

Citation: Henry and Mary Warner, autograph letter signed to John Riddle Warner.  Allegheny City [Pittsburgh], 19 October5 1864. Moore VI:06:10

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20061647

Backmark: “F. GUTEKUNST/Photographer,/704 & 706 Arch St./PHILADA.”

 

Citation: Frederick Gutekunst, carte de visite of Hyman Polock. Philadelphia, 1863-65. 2006.1647

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

AMs 1168-11 1864-10-16

Transcript:

Dated Selma Oct 16, 1864

Rec’d Montevallo

To Gen Taylor

Jacksonville

Gen Beauregard directs post comd’t here not to forward any more soldiers without arms. They are accumulating rapidly & we have no means of keeping them. Their arms ought to be with their commands.

E Surget

A.A.G.

 

Citation: E. Surget, telegram to Richard Taylor. Selma, Ala.; 16 October 1864. AMs 1168/11

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Henry and Mary Warner lived in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, now part of Pittsburgh. They are the great-grandparents of poet Marianne Moore.  By the 1860s they had three surviving children:  John, Henry, and Anne. Their letters to John, a Presbyterian minister living in Gettysburg, are preserved as part of Marianne Moore’s family papers. 

  Moore VI-6-10 p1 Henry and Mary Warner to John Riddle Warner 10-15-64 Moore VI-6-10 p2 Henry and Mary Warner to John Riddle Warner 10-15-64

  Transcript [excerpt]:

We think the loss of your winter overcoat was a serious one. The Htown ladies gift. We received a letter from Henry weekly as usual, at his request I paid his taxes at the court House amounting to 50 cents to enable him to vote as he says himself for ‘Old Abe’. It is now afternoon and by the time I shave &c for Sabbath will get little chance to read last nights paper and the other one will be in before I get the chance—your affectionate father & mother Henry & M Warner

 

Citation: Henry and Mary Warner, autograph letter signed to John Riddle Warner.  Allegheny City [Pittsburgh], 15 October 1864. Moore VI:06:10

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

 

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in the Rosenbach’s collection of papers from P.G.T. Beauregard.

AMs 1168-11 1864-10-14

 

Transcript:

Dated Opelika Oct 14 1864

Rec’d at Montevallo

To Gen G T Beauregard Hd Qrs A. T.

If a company of detailed Agriculturists present themselves under a new organization shall I receive them as such into the Confederate service.

J.W. Buford

Lt Col Comdg Post

 

Citation: J. W. Buford, telegram to G. T. Beauregard. Opelika, Ala.; 14 October 1864. AMs 1168/11

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in the Rosenbach’s collection of papers from P.G.T. Beauregard.

AMs 1168-11 1864-10-13

Transcript:

Montevallo Oct 13 64

Capt.

A special messenger will leave the Courier Stand at Blue Mountain every morning at daylight and bring dispatches directly to the officer. This will prevent delay or loss.

The line is now up as far as Wilsonville, and is being pushed.

Very Respy

M.W. Barr

[ChfMil Telg A.T.]

Capt AR Chisolm A.D.C.

Citation: A. R. Chisolm, telegram to unidentified recipient. Montevallo, Ala.; 13 October 1864. AMs 1168/11

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AMs 541-19-2 Ulysses S Grant telegram to William T Sherman

Transcript:

Head Quarters Armies of the United States,

City Point Va. Oct. 12th 1864.

Maj. Gen. Sherman, Kingston Ga.

Your dispatch of to-day received. If you are satisfied the trip to the sea coast can be made holding the line of the Tennessee river firmly you may make it destroying all the rail-road South of Dalton or Chattanooga as you think best.

U.S. Grant

Lt. Gen.

Citation:Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), autograph telegram signed. City Point, Va.,12 October 1864. AMs 545/19.2

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This map is one of twenty-four military maps and drawings in a collection of papers from Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard. The map is dated 1864.

 

Citation:  North Alabama & West Georgia. 1864. AMs 1168/11

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Daily Missouri Democrat 10-8-1864

Transcript:

“News Summary

From Grant’s Army!”

-

“New York, October 7.- The Herald’s Nashville dispatch of the 6th says: Democrats from Forrest and Wheeler are forming into guerilla bands The portion of Hood’s army which crossed the Chattahoocie attacked our forces at Big Shanty on the 5th and were routed, after tearing up a good portion of the track.

Richmond papers of the 3rd and 4th claim that Early holds Sheridan in check, and Early in a dispatch to the citizens of Lynchburg, says if they will turn out and beat the readers, he will hold the main force where they are.

The Richmond Examiner of the 4th says, the Union cavalry force was fourteen miles from Gordonsville, marching on that place. Genera Lee, Octobers 1st, reports the repulse of our forces in East Tennessee near Jonesboro.

The Herald’s 18th corps correspondent says no hostilities whatever are going on in their front. The rebel dead in front of Fort Harrison still lie unburied, the rebels firing on our men when we went out to bury them. The rebel loss in the assault on Saturday is admitted to be 4,000.

Ewell is said to be in command of the defences of Richmond, Lee having gone back to Petersburg. Richmond papers acknowledge the steady advances of Union armies on both sides of the James. They discuss Grant’s movements with great anxiety. Jeff Davis, in his speech at Macon, made a begging appeal to the Georgians to fill up the army.”

Citation: Daily Missouri Democrat. St. Louis, 8 October 1864. AN .M677

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

 

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

 AMs 1168-11 1864-10-06 AMs 1168-11 1864-10-06 verso

 

Transcript:

By telegraph from 4 Miles Southwest of Last Mountain

P.O 5 Via Neronan 6th 64

 

Gen Braxton Bragg

Lt. Gen Stewart with his Corps struck the western and Atlantic Railroad at Big Shanty on the evening of the third of Oct & effectually destroyed ten miles—He captured some three hundred & fifty prisoners at Acworth & Big Shanty—Maj Genl French is moving today to attack Allatoona—Shermans army appears to be moving out of Atlanta to meet us.

Signed J B Hood Genl

 

Citation: John Bell Hood (1831-1879), telegram to Braxton Bragg. 6 October 1864. AMs 1168/11

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