John Riddle Warner was the grandfather of the poet Marianne Moore and during the Civil War he lived in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. George Eyster was his brother-in-law and lived in Chambersburg, where he served as Provost Marshal for the 16th district of Pennsylvania from April 1863 to June 1865. These letters are preserved as part of Marianne Moore’s family papers.

Moore VI-6-4 p1 letter to John from GE 4-17-64 300 dpi Moore VI-6-4 p2 letter to John from GE 4-17-64 300 dpi

Transcript:

Sunday evening

Dear John,

I have spoken to Mary a number of times about the fact that she should write to you. Last week was Court and I was busy. Finding that she had not written, I concluded to write you a line to-day.

And first as to the baby: She is very contented and very well. She grows daily more beautiful and more interesting. All the fear I have for her is that her Aunt may spoil her by too much indulgence. Mary’s (my wife) tendency is towards indulgence and especially with this child. But she is conscientious and will try to do her duty I know.

I am anxious to hear about what success you are meeting with in New England. I love that section of the Country. It seems to me that there is the highest civilization and culture. There certainly have the people been truest to the principles of liberty and equality. O, the miserable men hereabouts, who prate of the rights of slaveholders and the freedom of speech. May they be confounded! There is a freedom of speech which leads to the most abject form of despotism. Our mutual friend disgraced himself this week in Court and did more to lower  that tribunal in the eyes of the multitude than any thousand previous indiscretions in bench or bar. He appealed to jurors to acquit a murderer, because his victim had been a black man. He asked them to acquit a man who had conducted the rebels to the store of another whom they robbed and whose right eye the villain struck out because [the other?] told him the truth – said he was a traitor and ought to be hung; this too in the face of the law that no ends justify an assault. I knew not.

If not to civil war at home, I know not whither we are tending. God preserve and defend the right!

John go on and deliver that “abolition” address. Give the disloyalists a shot whenever you can.

We succeeded after a hard, three days fight in convicting the Pittsburg Lieutenant of Manslaughter.

Very [illeg.]

Geo Eyster

Citation: George Eyster, autograph letter signed to John Riddle Warner. Harrisburg, Pa.; 17 April 1864. Moore VI:05:21

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henry warner

Henry Warner Jr. was the younger brother of John Riddle Warner, the grandfather of the poet Marianne Moore.  Henry served in  Independent Battery G from August 1862 until June 1865.

Citation: Unidentified photographer, photograph of Henry Warner. ca. 1864. Moore XII:01:18b.

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henry warner

Henry Warner Jr. was the younger brother of John Riddle Warner, the grandfather of the poet Marianne Moore.  Henry served in  Independent Battery G from August 1862 until June 1865.

Citation: Charles Cohill, photograph of Henry Warner Jr. Philadelphia, ca. 1864. Moore XII:01:18d.

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20064590-10

This photograph of an unknown woman comes from an album labeled “Mary Reed Grubb Book 1866.”

 

Citation: Carte de visite of unidentified sitter. In album belonging to Mary Reed Grubb. mid-1860s. 2006.4590

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 20064590-9 This photograph of an unknown woman comes from an album labeled “Mary Reed Grubb Book 1866.”

 

Citation: Carte de visite of unidentified sitter. In album belonging to Mary Reed Grubb. mid-1860s. 2006.4590

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This form certifies receipt of payment for government bonds to be issued according to an act of 17 February 1864.

AMS 1297-18 p3 Confederate Treasurer's Office Certificates of P  

Citation: Confederate States of America. Assistant Treasurer’s Office.Certificate of payment, 1864. AMs 1297/18

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Henry and Mary Warner lived in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, now part of Pittsburgh. They are the great-grandparents of poet Marianne Moore.  By the 1860s they had three surviving children:  John, Henry, and Anne. Their letters to John, a Presbyterian minister living in Gettysburg, are preserved as part of Marianne Moore’s family papers.

Moore VI-6-3 p1 letter to John 3-30-64 300dpi Moore VI-6-3 p2 letter to John 3-30-64 300dpi

Transcript:

Allegheny City, Wednesday, March 30. 1864

Dear John. Hoping Baby & yourself are well, I now sit down to write you a letter as from Mother – Henry left us on Friday night, and his visit was a very uncomfortable one to us. The day after he came he prepared for Sewickly, I asked him where he was going? He said to Sewickly, it knocked me down so much that I could hardly speak. I asked him if he was engaged to her, he told me yes. I bursted out crying and told him that he said, in promise to me, that he would not do anything that would worry me; it is two years ago since he made that promise to me, then he left without making me one word of an answer, and did not come back until 12 OClock next day. I told him that I hoped, I would be quietly laid in the cemetery before that would take place; I told him that he did not do as his brother done, that he did not disgrace us, nor himself; Had we known that he was going to Sewickly, there would never be one invited into the door on his account; I went to a great deal of trouble & expense on his account but had I known that he was going to Sewickly I would not have honoured him that much. He went the second time, and staid that night and part of the second day. We never said one unkind word to him about it, but we were very cool and very broken hearted all the time he was here, and it made me so irritable that I could hardly speak a kind word to any one; We have but three, and you know the circumstances that one is placed in, now we bless God, that if Henry is lost, we still have you.

We expected a letter from you this morning, as you were to lecture on Monday night, we thought you would surely on Tuesday drop a line in the Harrisburgh P.O. which we would have this morning giving us to know what success you have had, let it be good or bad we want to know it if it had been only one line, it would suffice for the present. We are all in tolerable health.

Your affectionate father & mother

Henry & Mary Warner

 

Citation: Henry and Mary Warner, autograph letter signed to John Riddle Warner.  Allegheny City [Pittsburgh],30 March 1864. Moore VI:06:3

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20060954

Backmark: “F. GUTEKUNST, Photographer,/704 & 706 Arch St.  PHILADELPHIA”

 

Citation: Frederick Gutekunst, carte de visite of an unidentified man. Philadelphia, 1863-1865. 2006.954

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20061648

Backmark: “F. GUTEKUNST/Photographer,/704 & 706 Arch St./PHILADA.”

 

Citation: Frederick Gutekunst, carte de visite of Elizabeth Sophia Binswanger. Philadelphia, 1863-1865. 2006.1648

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Henry and Mary Warner lived in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, now part of Pittsburgh. They are the great-grandparents of poet Marianne Moore.  By the 1860s they had three surviving children:  John, Henry, and Anne. Their letters to John, a Presbyterian minister living in Gettysburg, are preserved as part of Marianne Moore’s family papers.

Moore VI-6-3 p1 letter to John 3-23-64 300dpi Moore VI-6-3 p2 letter to John 3-23-64 300dpi

 

Transcript:

Allegheny City, Wednesday, March 23rd.1864 – 2 ½ P.M.

Dear John, your Welcome letter of Monday 21st, we received this morning, just as I brought it in (81/2 o’clock) in came Dr. Rodgers, who was on his way over to Pittsburgh, and wished to see Henry before he would leave for the East; Henry will leave on Friday evening 25th on 8 OClock train, so as to arrive at the Fort on 26th it being the day on which his furlough will expire. On last Sabbath he attended meeting in our church three times, forenoon, afternoon, & night. Your father did not go at night, but Mother & Henry did; On last Friday we had a few friends to take tea and spend the evening. Rev’d J.B. Clarke, Lieut Lewis of Fort Delaware, from Birmingham, Mrs & Miss Eliza Lewis, Robert, Anne, & their two children, Mrs Lockhart, & Miss Mary her daughter, Miss Annie Curry next door neighbor, & Miss Agnes Stevenson & your Bro Hy. I think all told. We are glad to know, “Baby & yourself are very well”. Late in spring or summer will be a long time to look for, but if we only have the pleasure of seeing each other then, alive and well it will be a joyful meeting; there is quite ‘a stir’ here about a sanitary fair, which is to be held in either Pittsburgh or Allegheny, both cities contend for the honor, and it is not decided yet where it will be held. Uncle Maxwell still exists and is pretty well. Acy has had a young daughter, and all is well up there; Next Friday week, Anne will be moving, and as you say, we do sincerely hope mother will get through that operation without damage.

Your affectionate father & mother

Henry & Mary Warner

P.S. We were favoured with the Legislation Record sent us by Hans “Henon Esq.” H.R. for which we return thanks, under his motion in behalf of Lee, coal company, also Allegheny and Perrysville Plank & Road Co.

The Evening Chronicle has a correspondent, who signs himself ‘Amos’, we will look for his allusion to your lecture on next Tuesday evening anxiously.

H.W.

 

Citation: Henry and Mary Warner, autograph letter signed to John Riddle Warner.  Allegheny City [Pittsburgh],23 March 1864. Moore VI:06:3

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