Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

 

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

AMs 1168-11 1865-03-28

 

Transcript:

Dispatched by Telegraph from Chester March 28 1865

To Gen Beauregard

No supplies are needed at Fort Mills that I can learn

E Willis

Major & QM

 

Citation: E. Willis, telegram to G. T. Beauregard. Chester, S.C.; 28 March 1865. AMs 1168/11

Share

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This telegram is from The Telegraphic History of the Civil War; a compiled album of telegrams to Beauregard from Davis, Lee, Johnston and others.

Telegram 3-27-65 (3) Johnston to Beauregard 10 mp

Transcript:

Dispatched by Telegraph from Near Smithfield March 27 1865

To Gen G. T Beauregard

How is Georgia organized? Please let Maj Willis ascertain if there are shoes in North Carolina. We want them much and Gen Lawton informed me that he had sent seven thousand (7000)

J.E. Johnston

31/WD

 

Citation:Joseph E. Johnston (1807-1891), telegram to G.T. Beauregard. 27 March 1865. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

Share

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This telegram is from The Telegraphic History of the Civil War; a compiled album of telegrams to Beauregard from Davis, Lee, Johnston and others.

Telegram 3-26-65 Johnston to Beauregard 10 mp

Transcript:

Dispatched by Telegraph from Smithfield March 26, 1865

To Genl Beauregard:

Send Signal Corps here. Gen. Holmes has promised two thousand (2000) arms for army of Tenn, please get possession of them immediately as he will go to Richmond tomorrow

J.E. Johnston

NN

 

Citation:Joseph E. Johnston (1807-1891), telegram to G.T. Beauregard. 26 March 1865. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

Share

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

 

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

AMs 1168-11 1865-03-24

 

Transcript:

Dispatched by Telegraph from Smithfield 24 March 1865

To Col Jno M Oley A.A.G.

Washams health will not permit him to remain in the field. Cant you provide for him in some way?

T.B. Roy

AAG

 

Citation:T. B. Roy, telegram to John M. Oley. Smithfield, Va.; 24 March 1865. AMs 1168/11

Share

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This telegram is from The Telegraphic History of the Civil War; a compiled album of telegrams to Beauregard from Davis, Lee, Johnston and others.

Telegram 3-23-65 Johnston to Beauregard 10 mp

Transcript:

Dispatched by Telegraph from Near Smithfield March 23 1865

To Gen Beauregard

Stores not needed for immediate use should not be accumulated above the quantity that can be removed in two (2) days. Rolling stock you mention can still be used for Gen Lee’s benefit can it not?

 

J. E. Johnston

 

Citation:Joseph E. Johnston (1807-1891), telegram to G.T. Beauregard. 23 March 1865. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

Share

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This telegram is from The Telegraphic History of the Civil War; a compiled album of telegrams to Beauregard from Davis, Lee, Johnston and others.

Telegram 3-22-65 Johnston to Beauregard 10 mp

Transcript:

Dispatched by Telegraph from Near Bentonsville March 22 1865

To Gen Beauregard

Send Robertson’s Brigade to Smithfield to join the Army.

J.E. Johnston

9/coll

WD

Citation:Joseph E. Johnston (1807-1891), telegram to G.T. Beauregard. Bentonsville, N. C.; 22 March 1865. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

Share

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This telegram is from The Telegraphic History of the Civil War; a compiled album of telegrams to Beauregard from Davis, Lee, Johnston and others.

Telegram 3-20-65 Johnston to Beauregard 10 mp

Transcript:

Dispatched by Telegraph from Smithfield March 20 1865

To Gen Beauregard

Genl Elzy being sent to Macon in command of artillery will not interfere with Genl Cobb’s local command, please so inform them. I think it will be better for you to bring up Lee. All artillery without horses including that which was at Smithfield should be sent immediately a far as Greensboro.

J.E. Johnston

Citation:Joseph E. Johnston (1807-1891), telegram to G.T. Beauregard. smithfield, 20 March 1865. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

Share

AMs 358-15 p1 U.S. Grant to Jesse Root Grant AMs 358-15 p2 U.S. Grant to Jesse Root Grant AMs 358-15 p3 U.S. Grant to Jesse Root Grant

Transcript:

Head-Quarters Armies of the United States,

City Point, Va, March 19th 1865

Dear Father,

I received your two letters announcing the death of Clara. Although I had known for some time that she was in a decline yet I was not expecting to hear of her death at this time. I have had no heart to write earlier. Your last letter made me feel very badly. I will not state the reason and hope I may be wrong in my judgement of its meaning.

We are now having fine weather and I think will be able to wind up matters about Richmond soon. I am anxious to have Lee hold on where he is a short time longer so that I can get him in a po-sition where he must lose a great portion of his Army. The rebellion has lost its vitality and if I am not much mistaken there will be no rebel Army of any great dimen-tions a few weeks hence. Any great catastrophy to any one of our Armies would of course revive the enemy for a short time. But I expect no such thing to happen.

I do not know what I can do either for Will Griffith’s son or for Belville Simpson. I sent orders last Fall for John Simpson to come to these Hd Qrs. to run between here and Washington as a Mail Messenger. But he has not come. I hope this service to end now soon.

I am in excellent health but would enjoy a little respite from duty wonderfully. I hope it will come soon.

My kindest regards to all at home. I shall expect to make you a visit the coming summer.

Yours Truly

Ulysses.

Citation:  Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), autograph letter signed to Jesse Root Grant. City Point, Va., 19 March 1865. AMs 358/15

Share

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This telegram is from The Telegraphic History of the Civil War; a compiled album of telegrams to Beauregard from Davis, Lee, Johnston and others.

Telegram 3-17-65 Johnston to Beauregard 10 mp

Transcript:

Dispatched by Telegraph from Smithfield March 17 1865

To Gen GT Beauregard

Please let no artillery without horses come on. Let it stop at Greensboro, order on all artillery horses

J.E. Johnston

15/Col WD

Citation:Joseph E. Johnston (1807-1891), telegram to G.T. Beauregard. Raleigh, 17 March 1865. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

Share

top

Transcript (excerpt):

Page 1, Upper Half

Newbern, N.C., March 12, 1865.

Yesterday the enemy fell back across the Neuse River, after burning the bridge over that stream.

It is reported that they also burned the Rebel ram at the same time, which was guarding the bridge.

Timber is now going forward to rebuild the bridge.

The railroad is completed to within a short distance of the river, opposite Kinston.

The enemy will not be able to remain in Kinston long, even if the decide to make another stand, of which there is much doubt.

Deserters and refugees continue to come into our lines.

The enemy suffered the most, owing to their repeated charges on out works, in which they were repulsed each time with severe loss.

Our troops stand their ground manfully, and are in high spirits over the prospect of meeting Sherman soon.

 

Citation: New York Daily Tribune. 16 March 1865. Gift of Steven and Susan Raab.

Share