AMs 777-3 p1 James T Hale to Abraham Lincoln AMs 777-3 p2 James T Hale to Abraham Lincoln

Washington Dec 19. 1864

To President Lincoln

Sir

I respectfully call attention to the case of George N. heard now a prisoner of war in Fort Delaware where he has been for more than a year. He emigrated from my district in Penna some ten years ago to Tennessee where he was at the commencement of the rebellion + was forced as he alleges into the Rebel army + taken prisoner. He has no family in the south all his relatives are good loyal men residing in my district + he is extremely anxious to take the oath of allegiance 7 return & live with his friends in Penna c. I am not personally acquainted with the prisoner but am with many of his relatives + from their good character in all respects have no hesitation in saying that I believe Geo. N. Heard may safely be allowed to take the oath & go north.

Your &c James T. Hale

Let this man take the oath of Dec. 8. 1863 and be discharged. A. Lincoln Dec. 20. 1864

Citation: James T. Hale, autograph letter signed to Abraham Lincoln. Washington, D.C., 19 Dec. 1864. AMs 777/3

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

AMs 1168-11 1864-12-18

Transcript:

By telegraph from Augusta 18 to J M Oley A A G

The line is open to Montgomery & Selma the enemy made a raid on Pollard on Friday destroying about a mile of the railroad & six miles of the line communication will be opened to Mobile in a few days.

J A Brenner

Citation: J. A. Brenner, telegram to John M. Oley. 18 December 1864. AMs 1168/11

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 Telegram 12-17-64 (1) Maury to Brent 10 mp  

 

Transcript:

Received at Montgomery 17 1864

By telegraph from Mobile 16 via Mosy To Col G.W. Brent

Column has been at Big Escambia all day with the dismounted Regiments of Clantons Brigade McCollugh reports Enemy at East Pascagoula three thousand of infantry landed yesterday the Cavalry that came from Baton Rouge Embarked at West Pensacola and have come into Mobile

 

Citation: Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900), telegram to George William Brent. Mobile, Ala.; 17 December 1864. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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   Telegram 12-16-64 (2) Maury to Brent 10 mp 

Transcript:

Received at Dec 16 1864

By telegraph from Mobile 16 To Col George Brent

Please have negroes furnished by Genl Withers from Montgomery to repair Railroad near Pollard when called for give me all information you can about affairs near Pollard

D H Maury

Maj Genl

27 w 1180 pay 540

 

Citation: Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900), telegram to George William Brent. Mobile, Ala.; 15 December 1864. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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Telegram 12-15-64 Maury to Brent 10 mp

Transcript:

Received at Dec 15 1864

By telegraph from Mobile 15 To Col G W Brent

Force Should be assembled at Pollard or nearest point above if Enemy be at Pollard line down between here and Pollard Since ten a.m. if I can get enough Cars at Tensas Clantons brigade dismounted will go up as far as possible Brigade of Cavalry also gone to operate from Blakely Capt Marshall reports one hundred & twenty five men organized at Greenville Send them arms &c. Mail train just through from Pollard

D H Maury

Maj Genl Comdg

74W3060pay1480

Citation: Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900), telegram to George William Brent. Mobile, Ala.; 15 December 1864. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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Telegram 12-14-64 Maury to Brent 10 mp

Telegram 12-14-64 verso Maury to Brent 10 mp

Transcript:

Received at Dec 14 1864

By telegraph from Mobile 14th To Col Geo Wm Brent

On Saturday a column detached to destroy Mobile & Ohio RRoad was met by McCullahs Missourians & Lexans near Robert Henry on Chickasawhay & driven back with some loss the main body crossed pascagoula river on direct road to Mobile but recrossed & returned [illeg.] down west side of Pascagoula sunday night – Reported that reinforcements are arriving at Pensacola Fleet in lower bay has been gradually increasing the cavalry force will probably operate from Pascagoula . I am anxious to have force assembled quickly at Pollard please aid me and keep me advised of all movements thither of reinforcements Genl Taylor left here yesterday for Meridian

D H Maury

Maj Genl

100/2000

Citation: Dabney Herndon Maury (1822-1900), telegram to George William Brent. Mobile, Ala.; 14 December 1864. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

 

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

AMs 1168-11 1864-12-13

 

Transcript:

By telegraph from Montgomery 13 to Gen G T Beauregard

Genl Taylor reports Enemy’s raiding party retreating rapidly to Miss city All quiet at Mobile. All Genl Hoods men will be sent immediately to Corinth. 25/480B Geo W. Brent col & aag

 

Citation: George W. Brent, telegram to G.T. Beauregard. 13 December 1864. AMs 1168/11

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 AMS 358-4 p1 U.S. Grant to Phillip H. Sheridan AMS 358-4 p2 U.S. Grant to Phillip H. Sheridan

Transcript:

(Cipher)

City Point, Va, Dec. 12th / 64

Maj. Gen. Sheridan, Kernstown Va.

I think there is no doubt but that all of Gordon’s & Pegram’s Divisions are here. The inhabitants of Richmond are supplied exclusively over the roads North of James River. If it is possible to destroy the Va. Central road it will go far towards starving out the garrison of Richmond. The Welden Road has been largely used until now notwithstandingly it has been cut to stoney Creek. It is now gone to Hicksford and I think can be of no further use. If the enemy are known to have retired to Staunton you will either be able to make a dash on the communications North of the James or spare a part of your forces. I know your view as to the practicability of nearing this […] and also as to the […] of detaining [?] troops. Let me know your views as to the best course, to make a dash in the Central road & canal or to detach from your command.

U.S. Grant

Lt. Gen.

Citation: Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), autograph letter signed to Philip H. Sheridan. City Point, Va., 12 December [18]64. AMs 358/4

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AMS 358-3 p1 U.S. Grant to Henry W. Halleck

Transcript:

(Cipher)

City Point, Va, Dec. 11th 1864

Maj. Gen. Halleck, Washington

There has been no news from Warren since the evening after he left. The Richmond papers however contain no news of any engagement with him beyond a rumored fight between Hampton’s Cavalry and some of his forces. A force of some 8,000 men were sent South yesterday under Gen. Potter to secure his return. The latest news contained in Richmond papers of yesterday from Sherman’s army says that on the 7th he was East of the Ogechie twenty-five miles from Savannah nearing on that place. On the 6th he had marched his army eighteen miles.

U.S. Grant

Lt. Gen.

 

Citation: Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885) autograph letter signed to Henry W. Halleck. City Point, Va., 11 December 1864. AMs 358/3

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

1168-11 1864-12-9 2

Transcript:

Charleston Dec 9/64

Gnl Beauregard

Flag Officer

Tucker referred applications for marines to go to Genl Ransom who replied –the military force in this district has been so much reduced that I deemed it unsafe to take another man from either military or naval command near here.

R. Ransom

He begs this to be communicated to you

R.C. Gilcrist

91/ A.A.

Citation:R.C. Gilcrist, telegram to G. T. Beauregard. Charleston, 9 December 1864. AMs 1168/11

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