20061918

Backmark: “F. GUTEKUNST/Photographer,/ 704 & 706 Arch St./PHILADA”

 

Citation: Frederick Gutekunst, carte de visite of Cornelia Binswanger Kahn. Philadelphia, 1863-65. 2006.1918

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Henry and Mary Warner lived in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, now part of Pittsburgh. They are the great-grandparents of poet Marianne Moore.  By the 1860s they had three surviving children:  John, Henry, and Anne. Their letters to John, a Presbyterian minister living in Gettysburg, are preserved as part of Marianne Moore’s family papers. 

 Moore VI-6-9 p1 letter to John from Henry and Mary 9-29-64 300 dpi Moore VI-6-9 p2 letter to John from Henry and Mary 9-29-64 300 dpi

Transcript:

Allegheny City, Thursday, September 29. 1864

Dear John, Last evening, we received your welcome letter, this afternoon we received the box by Express that you alluded to in your letter, all came to hand safe & sound. Grandma presented the peaches that you mention to our Dear little Mary, & at the same time informed her that her Pa was the donor, she is in excellent health & spirits. This is a great gala day with us. An immense Union convention is here assembled from towns at a considerable distance all round, although the rain has been pouring down in torrents all day, at noon a salute of 100 guns was fired and the people are making the most of it, visitors are about from subburbs and as it is now 4 OClock & clearing off there will be more of a demonstration – excuse haste, we appreciate the kindness very much, of the people who has made you such a rare gift of rich luscious fruit. Mary is at present sitting in the front door, she is singing a little song, looks well, has been lately washed, dressed, and her hair curled

Your affectionate father & mother

Henry & Mary Warner

P.S. Mother said to Mary just now, Mary you have left your rocking chair at the door, & some of the boys will take it away, well now you ought just to see the race she made for the door, it caused grandma to laugh hearty

H & M W

 

 

Citation: Henry and Mary Warner, autograph letter signed to John Riddle Warner.  Allegheny City [Pittsburgh],29 September 1864. Moore VI:06:9

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20061913

Backmark: “F. GUTEKUNST/Photographer,/ 704 & 706 Arch St./PHILADA”

 

Citation: Frederick Gutekunst, carte de visite of J. Henry Kahn. Philadelphia, 1863-1865. 2006.1913

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20060999

Backmark: “W.L. GERMON’S/ATELIER/No. 702 Chestnut St./Philada.”

 

Citation: W. L. Germon, carte de visite of Hannah Simmons. Philadelphia, 1864-1866. 2006.999

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AMs 357-30 p1 U.S. Grant to Benjamin F. Butler

Transcript:

City Point Va. Sept. 21st / 64

Maj. Gen. Butler,

Further news from Sheridan is better than the first we heard. In pressuring the enemy up the Valley Lee may be inclined to detach from here. Put every one on the lookout for any movement of the enemy. Should any forced be detached we must either manage to bring them back or gain an advantage here.

U. S. Grant

Lt. Gen.

 

Citation: Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), autograph letter signed to Benjamin F. Butler. City Point, Va., 21 September 18]64. AMs 357/30

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20061488

Backmark: “F. GUTEKUNST/Photographer/No. 704 & 706 Arch St.  /PHILADA”

 

Citation: Frederick Gutekunst, photograph of unidentified Rosenbach relative. Philadelphia, 1863-65. 2006.1488

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

This is one of approximately 1000 military telegrams in P.G.T. Beauregard’s papers at the Rosenbach.

 

1168-11 1864-9-17

Transcript:

Greensboro, Sept 17th 1864

To Col Geo Brent

Chf of Gen Beauregards Staff

Genl. Beauregard will be in Danville in the morning eight (8) o clock, and leave for Petersburg.

S.R. Chisolm

Maj + QM

 

Citation:S.R. Chisolm, telegram to George W. Brent. Greensboro, 17 September 1864. AMs 1168/11

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20061911

Backmark: “F. GUTEKUNST/Photographer/704 & 706 Arch St./PHILADA”

 

Citation: Frederick Gutekunst, carte de visite of Elizabeth Sophia Binswanger. Philadelphia, 1863-1865. 2006.1911

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Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Louisiana-born general of the Confederate States Army. He had graduated second in his class from West Point in 1838 and was an admirer of Napoleon. He achieved fame early in the Civil War for commanding the Fort Sumter bombardment and as the victor of the first battle of Manassas. He later served in the Western Theater (including Shiloh and Corinth), Charleston, and the defense of Richmond, but his career was hampered by friction with Jefferson Davis and other generals.

 

This telegram is from The Telegraphic History of the Civil War; a compiled album of telegrams to Beauregard from Davis, Lee, Johnston and others.

Telegram 9-14-64 Lee to Beauregard 10 mp

Transcript:

Received at Wilmington Sept 14 1864

By telegraph from Richmond 13 To Gen G T Beauregard

Are the batteries at Confederate point ready for the rifle guns to be sent from here or when will they be?

R E Lee

21/791 cc

 

Citation:Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), telegram to G.T. Beauregard. Richmond, 14 September 1864. In The telegraphic history of the Civil War, 1861-1865. AMs 434/16

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The New Book of Nonsense was published for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair, which ran from June 7 to June 29, 1864. It is an imitation of Edward Lear’s Book of Nonsense.

A 864n New Book of Nonsense (53)

 

  Transcript:

My good Southern Brother look here, one thing to my mind is quite clear-

If we put out this Furness, it no longer will burn us,

Nor warm little darkies up here.

 

Citation: The new book of nonsense. A contribution to the Great Central Fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. Philadelphia: Ashmead & Evans, 1864. A 864n

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