Hands-On Tour: Dracula

Date / Time

  • March 9, 2018
    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Get up close and personal with Bram Stoker’s handwritten notes (character and chapter outlines, chronologies, and more!) for Dracula as Rosenbach staff explore what it takes to create an enduring monster.

Winter reflections on the Year Without a Summer

Greetings from Frozen Philadelphia! After a snowy weekend and a lot of single-digit temperatures, we’re bundled up and back in the office. And as we shiver on our way to and from the museum, we’re thinking about some of our favorite authors, who shivered during an unseasonably cold summer 202 years ago. During the summer of …

Frankenstein200 at the Rosenbach

On January 1, 1818, the London publishing house Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor, & Jones published a book titled Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. The publication did not name its author, but the book had an preface written by Percy Bysshe Shelley and a dedication to writer and philosopher William Godwin, so some readers assumed that the …

Hands-On Tour: Dracula

Date / Time

  • January 19, 2018
    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Get up close and personal with Bram Stoker’s handwritten notes (character and chapter outlines, chronologies, and more!) for Dracula as Rosenbach staff explore what it takes to create an enduring monster.

In Conversation with the Rosenbach: It’s Alive! Frankenstein in the Modern World

Date / Time

  • February 1, 2018
    6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

In honor of the bicentennial of Frankenstein’s publication, we invited a historian of science, a literature scholar, and a biologist to a discussion moderated by a bioethicist. Their panel will explore the reasons that Mary Shelley’s vision has had such a profound effect on our imagination and on the way we structure our understanding of the ethical and social implications of biotechnology.

Bringing the science of Frankenstein & Dracula to life

In 1803, London was shocked by a public experiment conducted by an Italian scientist named Giovanni Aldini—nephew of Luigi Galvani, whose experiments with electrical currents gave the term galvanism its name. Aldini acquired the body of a recently executed criminal (a perfectly legal transaction, thanks to England’s Murder Act of 1752) and applied electric stimulus to the …

The Science of Bram Stoker’s Dracula

Since Frankenstein & Dracula: Gothic Monsters, Modern Science opened on Friday the 13th of October, I’ve fielded a few questions from surprised visitors: Dracula, really? It’s not difficult to see the connection between Frankenstein and the scientific theme of our new exhibition, but many readers are surprised to see us categorize Dracula as another gothic …