Sundays With Dracula co-hosts

Edward G. Pettit is the Sunstein Manager of Public Programs at The Rosenbach. In a former life, he taught monster books at a Philadelphia University. When not participating in reading marathons, he can usually be found at literary-themed cocktail parties.

 

 

Tucker Christine first picked up the novel Dracula as an act of defiance in the third grade. He hasn’t put it down since. Tucker has been a musician, an audio engineer, an automotive machinist, and a caterer. He currently resides with his wife, daughter, and son in Bensalem where he operates a BBQ catering company with his brother, and leads the instrumental band Pleated Gazelle. Through it all he has been a lifelong reader, fan, and collector of all things Dracula.

 

Mary Going is a PhD candidate at the University of Sheffield, exploring depictions of Jewish characters, myths and legends in late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth century literature. Along with Lauren Nixon she is co-organiser of Sheffield Gothic and the Reimagining the Gothic project, and is also lead organiser of the Gothic Bible project which hosted a ‘Buffy and the Bible’ conference in 2019 – complete with an evening Buffy singalong. Her publications include a chapter on Jewish vampires in Horror and Religion (UWP, July 2019), an article on witches, Jewish persecution, and sexual violence in Ivanhoe (in Bible and Critical Theory, 2019), and a forthcoming chapter exploring Supernatural and police procedurals. She is also the current Web Officer for the International Gothic Association.

Josh Hitchens is a Philadelphia-based theater director, actor, and playwright. He has written and performed several adaptations of classic horror novels, including Stoker’s Dracula (which he researched at The Rosenbach), Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (performed at the Mutter Museum), The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (performed in Clark Park with Curio Theatre Company), and The Picture of Dorian Gray (performed at the Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion). His original solo plays include The Confession of Jeffrey Dahmer and the autobiographical Ghost Stories. Josh also writes and narrates the podcast Going Dark Theatre, which explores in-depth tales of hauntings, unsolved mysteries, and horrific history. The podcast is available on iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Podbean. joshhitchens.weebly.com

Dr. Lauren Nixon recently acquired her PhD at the University of Sheffield, under the Centre for the History of the Gothic. Her thesis is titled ‘This trade of Death’: war and the figure of the soldier in Gothic fiction, 1764 – 1826, and her research interests are in the representations of masculinity, war, and national identity across the centuries. She is the co-organiser of the postgraduate collective Sheffield Gothic and the Reimagining the Gothic project, which seeks to promote accessible and diverse research in the field of Gothic studies. Alongside co-organiser Mary Going, Lauren recently launched the Sheffield Gothic YouTube channel. Outside of her academic life, Lauren is an avid consumer of a variety of pop culture and will argue, if given the chance, that almost any piece of literature or media could be considered Gothic.

Josh O’Neill is an Eisner and Harvey Award-winning editor, author and curator, as well as the co-founder and publisher of the Philadelphia small presses Locust Moon and Beehive Books, where he explores the unique capacities of graphic art and visual storytelling through art history, creative collaboration and experimental publishing. He is currently in the midst of a headache-inducing attempt to produce a particularly insane and ambitious edition of Dracula.

 


Upcoming guests

 

June 14: Dacre Stokeris the great grand-nephew of Bram Stoker and the international best-selling co-author of Dracula the Un-Dead (Dutton, 2009), the official Stoker family endorsed sequel to Dracula. Dacre is also the co-editor (with Elizabeth Miller) of The Lost Journal of Bram Stoker: The Dublin Years (Robson Press, 2012). His latest novel, Dracul, a prequel to Dracula, was released in October 2018 co-authored with JD Barker. He currently lives in Aiken, SC, together with his wife Jenne they manage the Bram Stoker Estate.

 

June 21: Award-winning author Grady Hendrix has written about the confederate flag for Playboy magazine, covered terrible movie novelizations and ninja death swarms for outlets ranging from Slate to the British Film Institute, and scripted award shows for Chinese television. His novels include Horrorstor, about a haunted IKEA, which has been translated into 14 languages; My Best Friend’s Exorcism, which is basically Beaches meets The Exorcist; and We Sold Our Souls, a heavy-metal horror epic that Library Journal named one of the best books of 2018. He’s also the author of Paperbacks from Hell, a history of the horror paperback boom of the 1970s and ’80s, which won the Bram Stoker Award for “Superior Achievement in Non-Fiction,” and he is the screenwriter of Mohawk (2017), a horror movie about the War of 1812, and Satanic Panic (2019), a horror movie about a pizza delivery woman battling rich Satanists. He’s one of the founders of the New York Asian Film Festival, which the New York Times called “one of the city’s most valuable events.” His new novel, The Southern Book Club’s Guide to Slaying Vampires is a New York Times bestselling book.

June 28: Gwendolyn Kiste, author of  “The Eight People Who Murdered Me (Excerpt from Lucy Westenra’s Diary),” a recent winner of the Bram Stoker Award from the Horror Writer’s Association.  You can read her story at Nightmare Magazine. Kiste is also the author of The Rust Maidens, from Trepidatio Publishing; And Her Smile Will Untether the Universe, from JournalStone; the dark fantasy novella, Pretty Marys All in a Row, from Broken Eye Books; and the occult horror novelette, The Invention of Ghosts, from Nightscape Press. Her short fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Nightmare Magazine, Vastarien, Tor’s Nightfire, Black Static, Daily Science Fiction, Unnerving, Interzone, and LampLight, among others. Originally from Ohio, she now resides on an abandoned horse farm outside of Pittsburgh with her husband, two cats, and not nearly enough ghosts. Find her online at gwendolynkiste.com

July 5: Leslie Klinger‘s ’s work has received numerous awards and nominations, including the Edgar® for Best Critical-Biographical Book in 2005 for The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Short Stories and the Edgar® for Best Critical-Biographical Book in 2019 for Classic American Crime Fiction of the 1920s and the Anthony for Best Anthology in 2015 for In the Company of Sherlock Holmes (co-edited with Laurie R. King). His New Annotated Frankenstein was recently nominated for a World Fantasy Award. His introductions and essays have appeared in numerous books, graphic novels, academic journals, newspapers, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and Playboy Magazine; he also reviews books for the Los Angeles Times. He was the technical advisor for Warner Bros. on the film Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (2011) and served (without credit) in that role for Warner Bros.’ earlier hit Sherlock Holmes (2009). He has consulted on a number of novels, comic books, and graphic novels featuring Holmes and Dracula. Klinger’s The New Annotated Dracula was published in 2008. The annotations cover a wide range of topics, from Victorian glossary to cultural history, enlightening the text. The notes also compare in detail the published text, the author’s working notes, the original manuscript of the novel, and the author’s abridgment. The introduction and extensive appendices examine the history of vampire fiction and other popular versions of Dracula, including film, stage, and comic book adaptations.