The Rosenbach offers exhibits, programs, and tours showcasing rare books, manuscripts, and art.

Plan Your Visit

Hours

Tuesday: Noon — 8pm
Wednesday: Noon — 8pm
Thursday: Noon — 8pm
Friday: Noon — 5pm
Saturday: Noon — 6pm
Sunday: Noon — 6pm

Closed Mondays and National Holidays.

For reading room hours, click here.

Admission

Admission includes exhibitions on view and a guided tour of the historic Rosenbach house.

Reservations for groups of 10 or more are required. For information about Group Tours click here.

Cost

Adults: $10.00
Seniors (ages 65 & older): $8.00
Students & Children: $5.00
Children under 12: Free
Rosenbach Members: Free! Click here to learn how to become a member.
Members of AAM,ICOM, & the North American Reciprocal Museum (NARM) Program: Free

Address & Directions

2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA 19103

Click here for directions

The Rosenbach is wheelchair accessible at our rear entrance - please call for assistance.

Current Exhibition On View

American Voyager: Herman Melville at 200

From 10/03/2019 to 07/05/2020

Few American writers have achieved the cultural impact of Herman Melville, author of the eternal classic Moby–Dick. Yet he died unrecognized for his genius by his contemporaries. To commemorate the two-hundredth anniversary of Herman Melville’s birth, The Rosenbach’s new exhibition, American Voyager, will explore the life, works, and legacy of this iconic but under-read author.

COMING SOON! Manjiro: Drifting, 1841–2020

From 04/02/2020 to 11/01/2020

Manjiro’s epic tale begins in 1841, when, as a teenager, he left his home village on a fishing trip. A violent storm left him shipwrecked and set the course that would lead Manjiro to become the first Japanese person to live in the United States. In partnership with the Japan America Society of Greater Philadelphia’s JapanPhilly2020 initiative, The Rosenbach will present a special exhibition on Manjiro’s legendary life, featuring holdings from our collection along with partner loans.

Upcoming Events

From The Rosenblog

“‘Exhibit’ is a noun, but it is also a verb, meaning to show or display.  Show or display what? Stuff.  Not pictures of stuff or descriptions of stuff, but stuff.  And the use of real, physical stuff…is what sets exhibits apart from books, TV, the Internet, etc.”  – Eugene Dillenburg, “What, if Anything, is a Museum?” In Exhibitionist, spring, 2011.  …

In 2019 we welcomed three new members to our board, including a new representative of the Free Library of Philadelphia Foundation Board of Directors. Emily Cavanagh, Lisa Washington, and Gene LeFevre each bring their own expertise and passion for our mission. We hope you’ll join us in welcoming them to the board and The Rosenbach community.   …

Could a poem inspired by an obscure folly, no matter how beautiful, hope to be anything but an obscure folly itself? Case in point: the masterful sonnet written by Robert Browning in honor of Helen’s Tower, a 19th century architectural folly built by an Anglo-Irish aristocrat in honor of his mum. The question springs to …

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Support the Rosenbach

About Us Image

The Rosenbach relies on contributions from our generous community of supporters to fund programs exhibitions, and collections care. Your generosity makes it possible for us to fulfill our mission of inspiring curiosity, inquiry, and creativity. There are a variety of ways to give: become a member, join the Delancey Society, or give an annual gift at any time.

Collections

The Rosenbach’s literary collections include virtually all of the manuscripts and papers of Modernist poet Marianne Moore (1887-1972), as well as her personal library, thousands of photographs, and the contents of her Greenwich village living room, thus making the Rosenbach the undisputed center for the study of this important American…
One of the greatest strengths of the Rosenbach’s library is Americana. The central topics of these collections are the European exploration and settlement of the New World and the political and military history of the United States from the first settlements through the Civil War. These histories are told in…
The largest portion of the literary collections is English literature of the British Isles, including Scotland, Ireland, and Wales. Among the most significant holdings are two 15th-century manuscripts of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales; an important group of 16th-and 17th-century poetical commonplace books; more than 450 books and pamphlets by Daniel Defoe,…
Objects in these categories are notable for their physical features in addition to their intellectual content. Maps in the collection indicate not only what was known about the world from the 16th through the 19th centuries, but what different users needed to know, presented in formats suited to their varying…