Robert Burns, Tam o’Shanter, and The Rosenbach

January 25 is Burns Night, when we celebrate the works of Scottish poet Robert Burns, the Bard of Ayrshire. It’s also a tradition here on Delancey Place, where our celebration features a night of readings, music, and whisky. The Rosenbach is home to the largest extant collection of Burns’s letters, manuscripts, and early editions. Learn more …

Happy birthday, Bram!

Break out your garlic necklaces and wooden stakes! Today marks Irish writer Bram Stoker’s 171st birthday. Author of Dracula—the inspiration for many a nightmare and pop-culture meme over the past two centuries—Stoker compiled and wrote his iconic novel over the course of seven years. His handwritten notes, including character and chapter outlines, chronologies, and more, …

Have a Spooktacular Halloween at The Rosenbach

We at The Rosenbach have some seriously spine-tingling tales in our collection, from Bram Stoker’s notes for Dracula to first editions of Polidori’s The Vampyre and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. What better place to celebrate the spookiest time of year than at the home of these and other horrific — and horrifically inspiring — literary treasures? …

Burns Night at the Rosenbach

On January 25, 1759, the poet Robert Burns was born in Ayrshire, Scotland. The anniversary of his birth is celebrated all over the world with scotch, songs, and poems by the prolific writer. Robert Burns holds a special place in the Rosenbach: our collection houses some remarkable early editions (including a stunning Kilmarnock edition that …

Romance at the Rosenbach

Love is in the library: over the holidays, two visitors got engaged while on a tour of the historic house. Admittedly, some of us were in on the plan. One of our artistic staff members created a library display case with a copy of the bride-to-be’s favorite book, Jane Eyre, opened to the page with the famous line “Reader, I …

Frankenstein200 at the Rosenbach

On January 1, 1818, the London publishing house Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor, & Jones published a book titled Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. The publication did not name its author, but the book had an preface written by Percy Bysshe Shelley and a dedication to writer and philosopher William Godwin, so some readers assumed that the …